Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN)

Post-Secondary Programs
Credential Earned: Bachelor's Degree
Campus: Timmins
Program Length: 8 Semesters

Program Code
H112 (PC) – Timmins Campus

Caring for your community – one patient at a time

In partnership with Laurentian University, Northern’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN) will prepare you to thrive in a multi-disciplinary healthcare environment. It will also give you the critical expertise, problem-solving skills, and bedside manner that will allow you to intervene when patients need you most.

Thanks to a comprehensive curriculum – and simulated medical scenarios at our state-of-the-art facility – you’ll gain first-hand experience with new technologies, emerging healthcare trends, and community-based nursing.

You’ll learn the interrelationship between theory, research, and practice. You’ll explore the underlying causes of illness and develop a methodology for diagnosis and treatment. And you’ll establish a benchmark for ethical high-quality care that will give you added traction in the workplace.

Nursing is a profession that provides opportunities for specialization, team work, leadership and personal growth. Nursing promotes partnerships with other health care professionals in caring for clients and families across the lifespan through a variety of health care settings.

Northern College is one of the partners in the Laurentian University BScN Collaborative Program and, as part of this partnership with Laurentian University, our nursing students are able to complete all four years of the BScN program at Northern. Upon successful completion of the BScN Collaborative Program, graduates earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree from Laurentian University.

Northern College’s nursing program provides opportunities for students to practice nursing skills in state of the art nursing practice labs equipped with integrative simulation equipment. This latest technology will assist in preparing students for actual client care through simulated medical scenarios.

Our nursing program also incorporates new technologies, such as specialized software packages and web-based tools, many of which are used in health-care settings.

Learning experiences will be enhanced through cooperation and consultation with faculty and peers through shared activities.

Northern also utilizes its on-site Family Health Team clinic, to provide an excellent opportunity for nursing students to experience community-based nursing first hand while working within an interdisciplinary health care team.

Career Opportunities

Upon successful completion of all courses outlined in the program of study, the graduate will eligible to write the examination for Registered Nurse credentialing as set out by the College of Nurses of Ontario. Graduates may find employment in acute and long-term care agencies, public health, community agencies, doctors’ offices, clinics, mental health services, traveling health agencies and with individuals and/or families.

Contact Information

Tanya Spencer Cameron BScN, NP-PHC, MSc, CCNE
BScN Collaborative Program Coordinator & Professor
Tel: 705-235-3211 ext. 2124
cameront@northern.on.ca

Admission Requirements

Program Specific Requirements

BScN Nursing Clinical Requirements

BScN Nursing Essential Requirements (International)

 

Domestic Admission Requirements

Students entering the BScN program require a minimum overall average of 75% for admission, including:

Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)
Six Grade 12 U/M credits including:
Grade 12 Math (U)
Grade 12 English (U)
Grade 12 Biology (U)
Grade 12 Chemistry (U)
Any two additional Grade 12 courses (4U/M)

Northern College does not offer academic testing for the Science equivalencies. The successful completion of Northern College’s two semester Pre-Health Science program (2014 or later, with a minimum GPA of 3.0) will provide students with the admission requirements for entry into the BScN program.

Our mature student status is defined by Laurentian University: an applicant who does not have a high school diploma or equivalent, and will have reached the age of 21 years on or before December 31 in the academic year. Admission for mature students will be in accordance with the policy at Laurentian University. Please contact Northern College’s Admissions Office at 705-235-7222 for more information.

Applicants and students in the Collaborative Bachelor of Science in Nursing program are required to disclose all education, which requires submission of all prior educational transcripts from high school and post-secondary studies. Failure to fully disclose your educational documents could be grounds for dismissal from the program.

The BScN program is oversubscribed and receives more than enough qualified applicants to fill the seats available. Applicants accepted into oversubscribed programs confirm their offer and pay their fees early to reserve a place in the program.

International Admission Requirements

1. Proof of Senior High School Diploma/Certificate

2. English Proficiency (we will require one of the following):

  • IELT Academic International English Language Testing System: minimum overall score of 6.0 must be achieved with no individual band score under 6.0;
  • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language): Computer based overall minimum score of 88, with the minimum of 22 in each component: Reading: 22; Listening: 22; Speaking: 22; Writing: 22.
  • PTE (Pearson Test of English) Academic – Graduate Diploma: 60+

PLUS Grade 12 Advanced Level (OSSD) equivalent Core Course with 75% in each for the equivalents of Mathematics, Chemistry and Biology plus 2 senior level courses.

If your country of citizenship has English as its official language, we may accept alternate proof of English Proficiency.

All educational documents must be submitted in English and will be dependent on the country of citizenship.

For more information, please contact admissions@northern.on.ca.

Additional Information

Below are admission requirements and/or forms that have to be completed before the start of the semester or the date specified.

COVID-19 vaccinations are now required for all students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Practical Nursing and Personal Support Worker programs, in order to be permitted to attend clinical hours with the Timmins & District Hospital. Please review the Placement Requirements to ensure you are up-to-date on vaccinations for your clinical requirements.

  • Clinical partner agencies may choose to create their own policies regarding mandatory student immunization against COVID-19 as a protective measure for residents and patients. Northern College is required to adhere to these policies as a requirement for staff and students attending clinical.
  • Students are now required to submit documentation for receiving 2 COVID-19 vaccinations prior to attendance at our partner health care agencies.  The health care agencies have confirmed their policies stating that all students are required to be immunized for COVID-19 in order to care for residents and patients. Students who do not meet this requirement will not be permitted to attend clinical hours and will not meet the expectations for the practical component of the program course, which will result in course failure. There will be no exceptions for this requirement.
  • Students must submit a copy of the official documentation for having received these vaccinations.
  • For more information please review the Placement Requirements.

Requirements for Clinical Placements

  • Completed Immunization/Communicable Disease Testing Requirements forms, supplied by the College
  • Current Basic Cardiac Life Support Certificate (BCLS/C.P.R. – HCP Level)
  • Standard First Aid Certificate (or equivalent)
  • WHMIS Certificate (may be obtained at a minimal cost through the College)
  • A recent Canadian criminal reference/vulnerable sector check (original only/photo copy not accepted) – must be applied for no earlier than July 1st of the current year and is required prior to the start of the fall Semester.
  • Mask Fit testing (offered in September, on campus by the Nurse Training Officers)
  • AODA certificate
  • Workers Safety Awareness in 4 Steps training certificate (free of charge, access via link to Ministry of Labour)

CPR re-certification, police record search, and immunization updates are required annually and are to be completed prior to the fall semester. Any costs for these tests/certifications will be the responsibility of the applicant. Students who do not comply with the immunization requirements will not be allowed into the clinical practice settings, and as such will not be able to complete the required practicum to graduate from the program.

To be eligible for participation in clinical training, the student must not have been convicted of any criminal offence for which they have not been pardoned. An unpardoned criminal record will result in inability to participate in clinical practice courses and could prevent the student from graduating. A criminal record may also impede the student’s ability to write the National Registration Exams required for nursing employment in Canada. As of January 1, 2005, the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO) requires all applicants for registration or reinstatement from within Canada to provide a recent Canadian Police Information Centre Criminal Record Synopsis (CPIC or OESC check) as part of the registration process. The criminal record check registration requirement enhances public protection by allowing CNO to identify those who have criminal records that could affect their suitability to practice nursing.

Students are responsible for the cost of appropriate uniforms and equipment (e.g. stethoscope, watch, etc.) required for the clinical area as well as transportation to/from practicum placements. Although we make every effort to accommodate the student’s preference of clinical placement location, students should be aware that they may be placed in a community outside of Timmins or Kirkland Lake, which may entail travel. Students are responsible for arranging transportation to and from clinical agencies, and they are responsible for all associated costs, including any overnight accommodation. Clinical days may include weekends and start/end times will reflect agency hours. Students are responsible for the cost of appropriate uniforms and equipment (e.g. stethoscope, watch, etc.) required for the clinical area, as well as any costs associated with transportation to/from practicum placements.

Semester 1
NS1004 (LU-NURS1004) Nursing Praxis and Professional Caring I

This course introduces the concept of health in nursing. Opportunities are provided to apply the nursing process in multiple educational contexts with an emphasis on safe and ethical care with older adults and families. Learners are required to integrate concurrent learning.

NS1056 (LU-NURS1056) Professional Growth I

This course focuses on an introduction to the profession of nursing. Opportunities are provided for learners to explore the evolution of nursing and professional standards within a Canadian context. Nursing knowledge is introduced in terms of relationships between theory, practice, and research. Learners are required to integrate concurrent learning.

NS1206 (LU-NURS1206) Relational Practice I

This course focuses on the learner’s discovery of self as nurse and self in relation to others. Opportunities are provided to engage in structured reflection guided by the literature and interaction with others. Emphasis is placed on understanding how select concepts relate to and impact on experiences with self and others. Learners are required to integrate concurrent learning.

BN2105 (LU-BIOL2105) Human Anatomy and Physiology

This course provides the anatomical knowledge base for all health related courses. The course describes human anatomy and physiology at the cellular, tissue, organ, and systems levels of organization, using current medical terminology. Aspects of this course will concentrate on clinical applications including causes, signs and symptoms of common diseases, as well as pathological effects of drugs and alcohol.

NS1001 Supporting Academic Success
General Education Elective

General Education Courses are selected online each semester by the student from a list provided and exposes students to a related area of study outside of their immediate academic discipline. Certain programs have predetermined electives. 

Semester 2
NS1094 (LU-NURS1094) Nursing Praxis and Professional Caring II

This course focuses on health assessment of individuals across the lifespan with an emphasis on well adults. Opportunities are provided to apply the nursing process and demonstrate clinical decision-making within a practice setting. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS1007 (LU-NURS1007) Health and Healing I

This course focuses on developing an understanding of family experiences with chronic health challenges. Opportunities are provided for learners to explore literature related to models of family assessment and chronicity as well as concepts relevant to health and healing. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS1207 (LU-NURS1207) Relational Practice II

This course introduces therapeutic use of knowledge and skills in relation to others in the context of professional relationships. Opportunities are provided to develop beginning competencies in the establishment of respectful and safe engagement for client-centred care. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

BN2105 (LU-BIOL2105) Human Anatomy and Physiology

This course provides the anatomical knowledge base for all health related courses. The course describes human anatomy and physiology at the cellular, tissue, organ, and systems levels of organization, using current medical terminology. Aspects of this course will concentrate on clinical applications including causes, signs and symptoms of common diseases, as well as pathological effects of drugs and alcohol.

General Education Elective

General Education Courses are selected online each semester by the student from a list provided and exposes students to a related area of study outside of their immediate academic discipline. Certain programs have predetermined electives. 

Semester 3
NS2084 (LU-NURS2084) Nursing Praxis and Professional Caring III

This course focuses on the application of integrated pharmacological knowledge and interventions within nursing process. Opportunities are provided to develop caring practice with patients experiencing health challenges. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS2006 (LU-NURS2006) Health and Healing II

This course focuses on the nurse’s role in meeting the health care needs of generative families. Opportunities are provided to develop an understanding of human growth and development and nursing care of the perinatal, newborn, and pediatric client. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

BN2220 (LU-CHMI2220) Clinical Chemistry

A course designed to develop nursing students’ understanding of the relationship between disease, the underlying biochemical causes and the methodology for diagnosis.

BN2036 (LU-BIOL2036) Microbiology for Health Sciences

This course is an introduction to microbiology and is offered to students in the Bachelor of Science Nursing program. The topics covered include morphology and structure, classification, microbiology techniques, microbial nutrition, growth, environmental effects on microbes, sterilization and disinfection, host-microbe interactions, antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents and a survey of common infectious diseases.

General Education Elective

General Education Courses are selected online each semester by the student from a list provided and exposes students to a related area of study outside of their immediate academic discipline. Certain programs have predetermined electives. 

Semester 4
NS2144 (LU-NURS2144) Nursing Praxis and Professional Caring IV

This course focuses on experiences with healing in relation to complex health challenges. Opportunities are provided to apply the nursing process, demonstrate pattern recognition, increase self-directedness, and participate in delivery of comprehensive care of patients. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS2057 (LU-NURS2057) Professional Growth II

This course focuses on complex issues inherent in the delivery of nursing care from a Canadian perspective. Opportunities are provided for learners to examine moral, professional, ethical, and legal nursing knowledge in relation to current practice. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS2107 (LU-NURS2107) Health and Healing III

This course focuses on human pathophysiology. Opportunities are provided to translate knowledge of such science to inform nursing practice. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

BN2220 (LU-CHMI2220) Clinical Chemistry

A course designed to develop nursing students’ understanding of the relationship between disease, the underlying biochemical causes and the methodology for diagnosis.

Semester 5
NS3005 (LU-NURS3005) Health and Healing IV

This two-semester course focuses on concepts, principles, frameworks and standards of practice relevant to the community health nursing context in Canada. Opportunities are provided to engage in community health assessment and program planning with emphasis on health promotion. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS3084 (LU-NURS3084) Nursing Praxis and Professional Caring V

This course focuses on health promotion and protection within the context of physiological, psychological, psychosexual, emotional, social, cultural, and spiritual health. Opportunities are provided to explore health and healing in relation to health-care delivery. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS3056 (LU-NURS3056) Professional Growth III

This course focuses on the examination of teaching and learning theory and methods. Through critical reflection, learners explore current evidence, beliefs, and values as they apply the teaching and learning process. Opportunities are provided to experience teaching and learning in the context of health promotion and protection. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS3406 (LU-NURS3406) Nursing Inquiry and Praxis I

This course focuses on the introduction of the foundations of nursing knowledge including philosophical, theoretical, and scientific underpinnings. Opportunities are provided to describe inter-relationships between theory and research grounded in clinical practice. Learning experiences require integration of new and prior learning.

NS3206 (LU-NURS3206) Practice III

This course advances the development of empirical, theoretical, and experiential relational praxis. Opportunities are provided to demonstrate advanced relational competencies to establish, maintain and bring closure to professional relationships in challenging circumstances. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

Semester 6
NS3005 (LU-NURS3005) Health and Healing IV

This two-semester course focuses on concepts, principles, frameworks and standards of practice relevant to the community health nursing context in Canada. Opportunities are provided to engage in community health assessment and program planning with emphasis on health promotion. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS3094 (LU-NURS3094) Nursing Praxis and Professional Caring VI

This course focuses on health promotion and health protection within the context of diverse aggregates. Opportunities are provided to further explore health and healing in relation to health-care delivery. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS3066 (LU-NURS3066) Professional Growth IV

This course focuses on the social construction of health inequities. Opportunities are provided to critically examine health outcomes of power inequities at the level of the individual, family, community, and professionally. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS3416 (LU-NURS3416) Nursing Inquiry and Praxis II

This course focuses on traditions of quantitative and qualitative nursing inquiry. Opportunities are provided to initiate nursing research praxis through the critical appraisal of published evidence. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

General Education Elective

General Education Courses are selected online each semester by the student from a list provided and exposes students to a related area of study outside of their immediate academic discipline. Certain programs have predetermined electives. 

Semester 7
NS4084 (LU-NURS4084) Nursing Praxis and Professional Caring VII

This course focuses on critical examination of nursing knowledge related to complex health challenges. Opportunities are provided to identify, appraise, and integrate relevant nursing knowledge to understand praxis. Learning experiences require the integration of new and prior learning.

NS4156 (LU-NURS4056) Professional Growth V

This course focuses on the critical examination of complex nursing practice issues. Opportunities are provided for learner to reflect upon their development as novice practitioners informed by evidence and standards of practice. Learners are required are required to integrate new and concurrent learning.

NS4206 (LU-NURS4206) Relational Practice IV

This course focuses on the development of relational praxis including emerging health care trends and associated nursing responsibilities. Opportunities are provided to critically examine and appraise intraprofessional, interprofessional, and intersectoral relationships for client-centered care. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

NS4416 (LU-NURS4416) Nursing Inquiry and Praxis III

This course focuses on promoting critical rationality in relation to selected topics for nursing inquiry. Opportunities are provided to systematically examine a current nursing issue through the theoretical application of methodological and ethical knowledge. Learners are required to integrate new and prior learning.

General Education Elective

General Education Courses are selected online each semester by the student from a list provided and exposes students to a related area of study outside of their immediate academic discipline. Certain programs have predetermined electives. 

Semester 8
NS4094 (LU-NURS4094) Nursing Praxis and Professional Caring VIII

This course focuses on the critical integration of theoretical, empirical, ethical, and professional knowledge. Opportunities are provided to demonstrate competent, safe, ethical, and evidence-informed practice as learners transition toward the role of a novice practitioner. Learning experiences require the integration of new and prior learning.

NS4157 (LU-NURS4057) Professional Growth VI

This course focuses on the examination of the underpinnings of leadership in promoting and maintaining high quality health care services. Opportunities are provided for learners to explore ongoing and potential changes within the practice setting. Learners are required to integrate new and concurrent learning.

Do you have the Requisite Skills and Abilities to Practice Nursing in Ontario?
Students considering the BScN program should review the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO) document “Requisite Skills and Abilities for Nursing Practice in Ontario”, The skills and abilities outlined in this document must be demonstrated in order to become a nurse in Ontario. Applicants who wonder whether or not they have the requisite skills and abilities to be registered as an RN or RPN should contact the CNO to explore the kinds of supports they might require.

The Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing further outlines the requirements for study:

Essential Requirements for Study in
Baccalaureate Nursing Programs in Ontario
(COUPN – Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing, January 2019)PURPOSE
This document provides information for applicants to Ontario baccalaureate nursing programs, students, faculty, staff, accessibility service providers, health professionals, and the public about the essential requirements required for successful completion of these programs. The purpose of the Essential Requirements document is to:

  • provide information to prospective baccalaureate nursing candidates so they can make an informed choice regarding applying to a program;
  • assist prospective and current candidates in deciding if they should register with student accessibility services;
  • assist candidates, student accessibility advisors, faculty, staff and health professionals in developing reasonable accommodations such that candidates may meet the essential requirements;
  • help ensure the safety of learners during the education program; and
  • help ensure the safety of patients/clients during student clinical encounters.

CONTEXT FOR LEARNING IN A BACCALAUREATE NURSING PROGRAM
Ontario baccalaureate programs in Nursing are responsible to society for providing their enrolled students with opportunities to develop the qualifications (academic knowledge, professional behaviours, attitudes and clinical skills) to enter the profession of Registered Nursing in Ontario. Learning moves from simple to complex in order to prepare graduates to meet entry-to-practice competencies set by the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO).[1] Students learn in the academic classroom and simulation lab, and also engage with patients/clients in a range of settings from hospital and long-term care to home and community. Patients/clients may be individuals in isolation or with their families; clients may also be a community or a population.

The description of the essential requirements below is not intended to exclude individuals who may require reasonable accommodation to achieve competency development. It is advisable to discuss such accommodations and/or learning supports with the university’s student accessibility services during the pre-admission or admission phase.

Requests for accommodation and/or learning supports are considered on a case-by-case basis, according to provincial laws and the educational institutions’ applicable policies, regulations and procedures.

An offer of admission to a nursing program is not evidence that the nursing program has independently verified an applicant’s ability to meet the essential requirements in the domains described below.

In addition to obtaining a Canadian nursing baccalaureate degree or equivalent, graduates must meet the additional seven requirements set by the CNO in order to become registered and practice as a Registered Nurse in Ontario.[2]

DESCRIPTION OF THE ESSENTIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS IN ONTARIO BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMS IN NURSING

COGNITION
Students must be able to acquire and retain new information from various sources. Examples include reading and comprehending a range of written documents, including anatomical diagrams, digital displays, medication labels, textbooks, articles, and columns of numbers such as those recorded on flow charts. Students must be able to sustain prolonged attention, concentration and focus in various academic activities, as well as in stressful and distracting practice environments. They must be able to retain information as memory and apply and transfer information from one situation to another. Other cognitive skills that are required include: telling time; counting rates such as a pulse; accurately adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing; computing fractions; using a calculator; writing numbers in records; identifying and differentiating sounds related to heart, lung or other body systems; and recognizing abnormal odours.

INFORMATION GATHERING ABILITIES
Students must be able to participate in learning situations and client interactions for the purposes of gathering and recording information. This information may be gathered in a number of different ways, including but not limited to observing (using all relevant senses), listening, searching, reading, understanding and synthesizing. Students will learn to gather information through interviewing, auscultating (listening with a stethoscope), palpating, smelling, percussing, and reviewing documents (such as reading charts and electronic documents). In addition, a student must be able to use, observe and use diagnostic aids and/or instruments directly or in an adaptive form for the purposes of gathering information.

CRITICAL THINKING CAPABILITIES
Students must be able to learn to use cognitive and information gathering skills to address individual patient/client needs by noticing, reasoning, interpreting, and responding in a safe, caring and appropriate manner.  This requires problem solving and judgment in order to analyze, integrate, synthesize, and apply information to the patient/client situation or context. Students must be able to become familiar with clinical models, theoretical nursing frameworks, and scholarly evidence in order to critically appraise these, and interpret and apply them in a particular patient/client context.

PHYSICAL/MOTOR ABILITIES
To succeed in a nursing program, students must have sufficient fine motor skills, physical endurance, physical strength and mobility to learn the clinical skills required to safely care for clients[3]

Examples include [4]:

Mobility:

  • Move within small spaces
  • Raise equipment above shoulders
  • Bend and reach
  • Walk, stand and maintain balance

Fine Motor Skills:

  • Manual dexterity to pick up, grasp and manipulate small objects with hands, with and without gloves
  • Use a computer
  • Perform complex sequences of hand/eye coordination, e.g., preparing and giving an injection

Physical Endurance

  • Correctly sustain repetitive movements (e.g., Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation)
  • Work for up to 12 hours, with occasional rest times

Physical Strength

  • Support clients with position changes, e.g., bed to chair.
  • Move, push, pull, and/or carry objects, e.g., computers, medication carts, lift machines
  • Use upper body strength for Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation

RESILIENCE
Students must be able to adapt to and manage a range of unexpected, changing, stressful, emotionally charged, and/or ethically challenging situations, for example respiratory arrest, bleeding, patient death, or disclosure of abuse. Students must be able to deal with academic requirements through prioritization of activities, effective time management, focus and discipline.  Some examples of academic requirements may include: presentations to colleagues, oral examinations, practical examinations, debates, and assignment deadlines. Students must be able to receive, reflect on and integrate constructive feedback. Students must be aware of their own emotions and behaviours and develop the ability to further regulate these in order to focus on required program activities. They must have the ability to recognize their own stress, develop stress management abilities and self-care strategies, including being able to seek resources and assistance when needed.

ETHICS
Students entering a nursing program must have an interest in assisting individuals and their families and communities in achieving their goals, and to do so in ways that acknowledge ethical values. The CNO has identified the following values as being most important to providing nursing care in Ontario [5]:  client well-being, client choice, privacy and confidentiality, respect for life, maintaining commitments, truthfulness, and fairness. To succeed in nursing, students must demonstrate integrity, sensitivity, compassion and concern for others including clients, peers and colleagues with whom they work collaboratively to build trusting relationships. They must be respectful of the individuality and diversity of others, regardless of their background characteristics such as age, health status, place of origin, race, culture, ethnicity, political or spiritual beliefs, socio-economic status, marital status, occupation, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, lifestyle, mental ability, or physical ability.

COMMUNICATION AND INTERPERSONAL ABILITIES
The ability to develop mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients, families and other members of the health care team is required. This includes the ability to communicate with and relate to other people in a caring manner.

Students must have the ability to develop excellent observational, listening, oral and written communication skills, as well as to develop the capacity to sensitively perceive and convey verbal and non-verbal information effectively and efficiently. Students must also be able to develop the ability to coherently summarize the patient/client condition, assessment, and intervention plan, both verbally and in text, in compliance with regulatory and organizational record-keeping standards and privacy and confidentiality legislation and standards.

Examples include:

  • Hear, speak, write, and comprehend the principal language or languages of the program
  • Learn to understand and respond to patient and colleague perspectives
  • Become aware of and respond to the body language of oneself and others
  • Develop an understanding and use of clinical terminology
  • Learn to document pertinent patient findings in writing or in electronic format

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Ontario’s Schools of Nursing are committed to ensuring that students are afforded an academic environment that is dedicated to the advancement of learning and that is based on the principles of equitable access and individual dignity; as such, they are committed to facilitating the integration of students with disabilities into the University community. The Faculties/Schools of Nursing also strive to preserve the academic integrity of the University and the program by affirming that all students satisfy the essential requirements of the program and program courses.

Each student with a disability is entitled to reasonable accommodation that will assist them to meet the program standards and academic requirements.  Reasonable accommodation cannot compromise the essential requirements of a program or client/patient safety and well-being. The purpose of a reasonable accommodation is to ensure the student with a disability has the same opportunity as ​their student peers to attain the required operational level, but is not meant to guarantee success in the program.

Exploring reasonable accommodation options may involve the exercise of flexibility by both the University and the student with disability, while maintaining the academic and technical standards and requirements of the program. The student with a disability must be able to demonstrate the requisite knowledge and behaviours, and perform the necessary skills independently and safely.  In rare circumstances an intermediary may be appropriate.  Instances when an intermediary may not be appropriate include, for example, where the intermediary has to provide cognitive support; or is a substitute for cognitive skills; or is solely conducting an assessment or treatment; or supplements clinical reasoning or judgment.   The appropriateness of an intermediary will be assessed on a case by case basis.

Before accepting an offer of admission, students who may require disability related accommodations are strongly advised to review the policies, procedures, and regulations regarding accommodations and consult with the University’s student accommodation services and the Faculty/School making the offer. Please note that certain accommodations obtained in previous educational settings may not be appropriate, particularly with respect to clinical requirements. If admitted, students will be required to follow the policies and procedures of the University and Faculty/School within which the program is located.

NOTE:  specific programs in Ontario may have additional program specific essential requirements.

Approved by COUPN January 2019

[1] http://www.cno.org/globalassets/docs/reg/41037_entrytopracitic_final.pdf.

[2] http://www.cno.org/en/become-a-nurse/registration-requirements/

[3] These abilities could be demonstrated with or without accommodations, as noted in the Context section above.

[4] Modified from, “Representative Skills, Abilities, and Capacities for the Bachelor of Nursing Program,” University of Manitoba http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/nursing/undergrad/rep-skills.html.

[5] http://www.cno.org/globalassets/docs/prac/41034_ethics.pdf.

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