Police Foundations

Post-Secondary Programs
Credential Earned: College Diploma (2 Year)
Campus: Timmins
Program Length: 4 Semesters

A227 (PC) – Timmins Campus

Our Police Foundations Program is geared to provide an exciting learning experience for all our students. Academic studies combined with hands on realistic training gives our students the skills and knowledge they will need in furthering their goals of obtaining a career in law enforcement.

Due to our smaller class sizes the students have the access to instructors and learning material that helps them to be successful in their studies. Our instructors are serving and retired officers from Timmins Police and the Ontario Provincial Police. Northern College has a great partnership with both the Timmins Police Service and the O.P.P as well as the Monteith Correctional center. Students will have the opportunity to volunteer with the O.P.P. in their block training during winter semesters.

This is a chance to see firsthand officer training and gain networking accessibility. In the fall of 2018 our new Integrated Emergency Services building was open. Along with state of the art class rooms we have a jail cell, cruiser bay, interview room, fingerprint and mugshot room, as well as a full size court room. Our facility also has a training lab along with a full training apartment to run scenarios. Outside is a training intersection for scenario use by all our emergency services program.

As a graduate of this program, you may pursue a future career in law enforcement, civilian positions in police and 911, municipal by-law enforcement, special constable positions, private security, correctional services.

 

Contact Information

Rick Lemieux
Phone: (705)-235-3211
Email: lemieuxr@northern.on.ca

Admission Requirements

Program Specific Requirements

Police Foundations Requirements

 

Domestic Admission Requirements

Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)
Grade 12 English (C, U)
Or equivalent

Or mature student status (an applicant who does not have a high school diploma or equivalent, and will have reached the age of 19 years on or before the start of the program). Mature students must undergo academic testing prior to admission into a program. Call the Admissions Office at 705-235-7222 for more details. Academic prerequisites for this program may be obtained free of charge through Academic Upgrading.

International Admission Requirements

1. Proof of Senior High School Diploma/Certificate

2. English Proficiency (we will require one of the following):

  • IELT Academic International English Language Testing System
    a minimum overall score of 6.0 must be achieved with no individual band score under 6.0; however, we will accept one band at 5.5.
  • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) – Computer-based overall minimum score of 79
  • PTE (Pearson Test of English) Academic – Graduate Diploma: 58+

If your country of citizenship has English as its official language, we may accept alternate proof of English Proficiency.

All educational documents must be submitted in English and will be dependent on the country of citizenship.

For more information, please contact admissions@northern.on.ca.

Additional Information

To be eligible for participation in practicum experience, students must not have been convicted of any criminal offence for which that person has not been pardoned. An unpardoned criminal record may result in inability to participate in clinical practice courses and could prevent the student from graduating. Any costs for these tests/certifications will be the responsibility of the applicant. Students are responsible for the cost of appropriate uniforms and shoes.

Bring Your Own Device
Northern College requires all students to have and use their own laptop computer. The College’s Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) program is mandatory for all students.

Semester 1
CM1903 Communications I – Model A

The student will apply the fundamentals of formal oral and written communications for current, practical business and technical communication situations. Specifically, students will be able to identify, correct, describe, demonstrate and/or discuss topics in: Communication Foundations (importance of communications and the communications process and barriers); Grammar Essentials (basic sentence faults such as Sentence Fragments and Run On Sentences); Writing Process (techniques for greater effectiveness); and Business Correspondence (characteristics of well written letters and different letter patterns). In addition, students will demonstrate they can plan, conduct and participate in meetings and prepare for, deliver and explain the parts of effective Oral Presentations.

EC2033 Working With Diversity

Students will explore and examine the many layers of diversity that surround individuals and identifiable groups in society and they will see how these many layers contribute to a rich, diverse Canadian cultural landscape. As part of this examination, students will have the opportunity to reflect on their personal attitudes, assumptions and views toward diverse population groups. As a brief introduction, students will begin developing their understanding of diversity by identifying, discussing, and defining core terminology like privilege, cultural competence, and cultural safety, Students will enhance their knowledge and understanding of diversity by looking at origins of differences among various population groups in Canada and by looking at society’s attitudes associated with Canadian Regionalism, demographic trends, First Nations peoples, immigration, and various other established minority groups. Also, learners will become aware of government policies and influence on certain segments of Canadian society and its role in dealing with social inequalities. Finally, students will look at and reflect on the media’s role in perpetuating stereotypes and swaying personal views of diversity in Canada. Cultural Competence involves a dialogue between the worker and the client. It does not rely solely on the skills and competence of the worker, but rather emphasizes open and constant communication based on mutual respect and equal rights. The students will learn about the concept of Cultural Competence and Social and Economic Justice. The history and current social conditions of many historically oppressed groups will be covered in detail to help the student gain the awareness, knowledge and skills necessary to attain Cultural Competence.

General Education Elective

General Education Courses are selected online each semester by the student from a list provided and exposes students to a related area of study outside of their immediate academic discipline. Certain programs have predetermined electives. 

PF1033 Interviewing & Investigation

This course focuses on interviewing and investigation skills and will examine the requirement of a continuing investigation. Students will be introduced to the interviewing skills necessary to retrieve information from victims, witnesses and suspects. Related skills are practised and developed as a basis for interviewing and to guide interactions. Students will be introduced to the basic steps of investigation. Oral and written communications are necessary to fulfill the requirements of interviewing and investigation. Students will be introduced to the rules of evidence and will have the opportunity to apply rules in the collection and presentation of evidence in a court of law. Forensic requirements, statute law and other related issues will be emphasized\

PF1053 Canadian Criminal Justice System

This introductory course provides the student with an overview of the Canadian Criminal Justice System with particular emphasis on the history, function, role and organization of Canadian law enforcement services. The operation of the criminal justice system will be examined and analyzed in light of contemporary issues affecting the system. Each major component from enforcement through the courts and correctional services will be explored.

PF1032 Technology in Policing

This course has been developed to acquaint students interested in pursuing a career in law enforcement with the technologies utilized in the criminal justice field. Through an examination of historical and current operating systems, students will receive an introduction to various computer programs including; Enhanced 911, Records Management System (RMS), Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC), and Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD), which includes detailed mapping information. In addition, students will learn how these systems are integrated globally through the National Crime Information Centre (NCIC) and Interpol and the correlation between them. Students will be introduced to the world of Social Media and how it relates to policing in todays society. Online threats, harassment and online scams will be examined to demonstrate how police use technology to investigate this growing online criminal trend. Further, students will participate in broader discussions pertaining to the advantages and disadvantages of available technologies and be able to critically analyse the pros and cons of its impact on today’s policing community.

PF1093 Fitness & Lifestyle Management I

The purpose of this course is twofold: 1) To ensure that the student has been given every opportunity to reach the level of physical fitness readiness necessary to prepare for entry into law enforcement fields. The successful student will have attempted to pass the required PREP (Physical Readiness Evaluation for Police) as per standards set by the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police. 2) Increase awareness of physical fitness as a component of wellness. For this reason, the course will also cover topics such as self-assessment of fitness, goal setting and time management. To be fit without being healthy and well is not to have finished the journey toward a full life.

PF1123 Career Prep I

This course will prepare students for the job search including preparing for interviews, as well as preparing for the testing process involved in police officer recruitment.

PF3033 Traffic Management

In this course, students will be introduced to the knowledge, skills and ability to locate and apply sections of the Provincial Traffic Law. Students will practice locating topics in the Acts and Regulations, will master the definitions required to interpret traffic laws and will apply the law concerning Police Authorities, driver’s licenses, permits and rules of the road. Students will develop and practice interpersonal strategies and procedures for dealing with motor vehicle stops. In the second part of the course, students will be introduced to the knowledge and be able to practice skills and ability to apply operating offences to real life scenarios. Students will also be able to practice employing strategies and procedures for managing an accident scene.

Semester 2
CM2903 Communications II – Model A

Communications II is a one-semester course which applies the oral and written communication tools learned in the first semester to specific business/technical applications as required by industry today. The student will enhance writing skills acquired in CM1903 and learn to produce effective documents including business letters, memoranda, emails, employment documents as well as reports and problem solving documents as applicable to their field of study. The course presents the theory and practice necessary for the planning and presentation of short informal and formal reports and introduces the dynamics of planning and participating in meeting situations. Students will participate in mock interviews (as applicable), so that they are prepared to sell themselves as they transition into the competitive employment market. Students will continue to review grammatical structures and apply editing strategies to business/technical documents through both in-class activities and the usage of the customized online grammar tool. As with CM1903, the content will be inclusive and reflect the diverse workplace that students will find themselves in in the future.

PF1013 Provincial Offences

Students will examine scenarios and determine the appropriate enforcement action for the most common provincial statutes. Topics studied will include arrest, search and seizure authorities, common offences and the involvement of non police agencies. Statutes examined will be: Provincial Offences Act, Mental Health Act, Residential Tenancies Act, 2006, Trespass to Property Act, Liquor License Act, Child and Family Services Act, Family Law Act, Children’s Law Reform Act, Coroners Act, the Blind Persons’ Act, and the Police Services Act.

PF1023 Police Powers I

This course will examine pertinent sections of the Canadian Chart of Rights and Freedoms and their impact on the Canadian Criminal Procedure. Citizen and police arrest and release authorities, police powers of search and seizure, with and without warrant, police discretion and its implications will be discussed. This course will enable the student to become familiar with police terminology and apply procedures required to affect arrest and release.

PF2073 Behaviour and Drugs

The Behaviour and Drugs course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of pharmacokinetics (the movement of drugs through the body, including administration, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) and pharmacodynamics (the mechanism of action of drugs). In this course, we will be examining how different drugs affect the body and mind. We will also look at issues such as tolerance, dependence, and the therapeutic use of commonly abused drugs in society and examine the behaviours that accompany them. The following legal and restricted classes of drugs will be covered in the course: stimulants, narcotics, sedatives, hallucinogens and psychotherapeutics, such as antidepressants. The course should leave the learner with knowledge of basic pharmacology, neurology and psychotherapy and how some specific drugs, such as nicotine, work in the body to produce their effects. Students will gain an understanding of the issues surrounding the use of drugs and the different behaviours displayed with illicit drugs use. Real case studies will be used throughout the course to deepen the topics at hand, such as the experience of an ex-narcotic abuser. Guest speakers may also be available to enhance specific areas of interest in this course, such as the methadone maintenance treatment. The learner will finish this course with a well-rounded introduction to the many aspects of drug use, including how different classes of drugs work in the body and will begin to understand the factors that may affect drug use behaviour. Finally, the student will be able to apply the knowledge learnt from the course in a major assignment for prevention and treatment of drug abuse in our youth.

PF2093 Fitness & Lifestyle II

The purpose of this course is twofold:To ensure that the student has been given every opportunity to reach the level of physical fitness readiness necessary for entry into the police services field. The successful candidate will have passed the required PREP (Physical Readiness Evaluation for Police) as per standards set by the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police. To make the student aware that physical fitness is but one component of wellness. For this reason, the course will also cover topics such as weight control, stress and stress management, heart disease, cancer, exercise injuries, etc. To be fit without being healthy and well is not to have finished the journey toward a full life.

PF2143 Career Prep II

As a continuation of the Career Prep I Course, this course will prepare the student for the job search process in policing, as well as preparing for interviews, and the varied testing processes involved in officer recruitment.

PF4053 Politics & Public Administration

Organizational theory, the theory of public administration and public sector management, as well as the structure and function of government and the public administration and political processes will be addressed in this course.

PF4063 Community Policing

This course addresses the issues of policing in communities as well as the importance of involving citizens in meeting community policing needs. The Group Studies component of this course will assist students in understanding the need for, and process of forming groups to achieve goals.

PF4073 Professional Issues, Research & Ethics

Internet access by mass media to down loads from cell phones within hours of an event has led to high levels of scrutiny by the public and governments of police officers. Ethical behavior and the fallout from inappropriate conduct are some of the most critical issues facing organizations today. This course explores ethical issues, controversies, and professional scenarios faced by police officers as individuals and professionals. Students are provided with opportunities to identify and clarify their values to then establish a framework for ethical decision making. They will research and examine a variety of professional ethical codes to then apply ethical decision making models to dilemmas in their personal and professional lives. Scenario-based training exercises centred on ethics are presented throughout the course, to reinforce equitable, effective, and ethical behaviour among the students. As a result, students will hone their ability to think critically and carefully about their actions, their decisions, and their values.

Semester 3
FF1022 Emergency Patient Care

The emphasis of this course is placed upon developing assessment skills for use in planning the stabilization and management of patients in a variety of medical/trauma situations. Students will be introduced to patient assessment, pathological processes and the management of various medical and traumatic problems that may afflict pre-hospital patients. Assessment is taught using a “hands on” approach that involves demonstration, performance and practice to hone skills. Practical sessions will follow the same outline as theoretical components of the course to assist in reinforcing knowledge and skills.

FF1041 Emergency Patient Care Practice

The emphasis of this course is placed upon developing assessment skills for use in planning the stabilization and management of patients in a variety of medical/trauma situations. Students will be introduced to patient assessment, pathological processes and the management of various medical and traumatic problems that may afflict pre-hospital patients. Assessment is taught using a “hands on” approach that involves demonstration, performance and practice to hone skills. Practical sessions will follow the same outline as theoretical components of the course to assist in reinforcing knowledge and skills.

NA1403 Social Work and First Nations Peoples

This course is fundamentally intended to create a greater awareness of First Nations Peoples and the socioeconomic, political and legal issues they are facing today. This requires a sensitive and respectful exploration of the various First Nations cultures and their history within Canada both prior to and following European contact. Students who will be working with First Nations Peoples are expected to increase their Cultural Competence and ability to provide a culturally safe helping environment; the knowledge, values and skills developed in this course provide a foundation to work with the many diverse individuals and groups that exist.

PF1032 Technology in Policing

This course has been developed to acquaint students interested in pursuing a career in law enforcement with the technologies utilized in the criminal justice field. Through an examination of historical and current operating systems, students will receive an introduction to various computer programs including; Enhanced 911, Records Management System (RMS), Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC), and Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD), which includes detailed mapping information. In addition, students will learn how these systems are integrated globally through the National Crime Information Centre (NCIC) and Interpol and the correlation between them. Students will be introduced to the world of Social Media and how it relates to policing in todays society. Online threats, harassment and online scams will be examined to demonstrate how police use technology to investigate this growing online criminal trend. Further, students will participate in broader discussions pertaining to the advantages and disadvantages of available technologies and be able to critically analyse the pros and cons of its impact on today’s policing community.

PF2143 Career Prep II

As a continuation of the Career Prep I Course, this course will prepare the student for the job search process in policing, as well as preparing for interviews, and the varied testing processes involved in officer recruitment.

PF3043 Investigation and Forensics

This course focuses on investigation skills and will examine the requirements of a continuing investigation. Students will be introduced to the basic steps of investigation. Oral and written communications are necessary to fulfill the requirements of investigation and evidence. Interviewing and investigation are essential to the conduct of police work. Students will be introduced to the rules of evidence and develop the ability to apply rules in the collection and presentation of evidence in a court of law. Forensic requirements, statute law and other related issues will be emphasized.

PF3053 Fitness & Lifestyle III

The purpose of this course is twofold:To ensure that the student has been given every opportunity to reach the level of physical fitness readiness necessary for entry into the police services field. The successful candidate will have passed the required PREP (Physical Readiness Evaluation for Police) as per standards set by the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police. To make the student aware that physical fitness is but one component of wellness. For this reason, the course will also cover topics such as weight control, stress and stress management, heart disease, cancer, exercise injuries, etc. To be fit without being healthy and well is not to have finished the journey toward a full life.

PF4003 Criminology

This course provides an examination of various theoretical explanations of criminal and deviant behaviour including the sociological, biological and psychological perspectives. Criminology theory is related to various types of criminal activity and the reality of crime in Canada including victimology is examined through crime statistics and correlation of criminal behaviour. The impact of theory on the development and effectiveness of the criminal justice system is discussed with the emphasis of future trends within the system.

Semester 4
General Education Elective

General Education Courses are selected online each semester by the student from a list provided and exposes students to a related area of study outside of their immediate academic discipline. Certain programs have predetermined electives. 

PF2004 Criminal Civil Law & Federal Statutes

This course will enable the student to analyze the elements of an offense, to classify offenses and to identify possible defences in criminal cases. This course will also enable the student to analyze the rights and obligations of citizens involving areas of civil law. This course will identify other Federal Statutes, such as Controlled Drugs and Substance Acts and the Young Offenders Act. The student will recognize the responsibilities and limitations of citizens and police officers in light of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The student will develop legal research and analysis skills to locate, interpret and apply statute and case law.

DA1023 Concurrent Disorders

Concurrent mental health and substance use disorders likely have always coexisted for many people, however, the combination of the two have only been gaining more attention in the last number of years. There is an increasing recognition that in many people’s lives the two cannot be separated. There is recognition of the need for collaboration between police services and community agencies when someone with a concurrent disorder presents for help. Although the majority of people with mental health conditions rarely come into contact with police, psychiatric emergencies do occur. In most cases, 911 is dialed and police, by virtue of their role as emergency responders, are called upon to assist in the mental health crisis. Historically, a person living with a concurrent disorder who would look for help to deal with either disorder would be shifted from one treatment setting to another. If someone with depression presented at a community addiction treatment agency looking for help with alcoholism he or she would have been asked to see mental health counselors at the community mental health agency. Once there the client would be asked to get help for the alcohol problem before coming back to the mental health agency. In the end, the person is left feeling undervalued and hopeless. This course will provide the students with information about concurrent disorders in relation to recognition and treatment. Students will gain skill in relation to asking the right questions in order to screen and conduct basic assessments for concurrent disorders. They will be able to continue working with that person while directing them to appropriate services. It’s important to have information about services available for those living with a concurrent disorder. One of the biggest barriers to accessing treatment for someone living with a concurrent disorder is the stigma associated with the disorders. We will examine this stigma and look at the ways that it turns into discrimination. We will also have the opportunity to self-examine, to allow students become aware of the stigma they carry and how they can continue to assist people in a positive and helpful way. Diversity is a basic characteristic of Canadian society, and delivering mental health and addiction services in ways that are effective, fair, inclusive, respectful and culturally competent is important. This course will enable students to play a role in eliminating the stigma faced by people with substance use and/or mental health problems, including those from diverse ethno cultural communities.

PF2023 Police Powers II

This course is a continuance of Police Powers I and will focus on police governance and accountability issues related to the Police Services Act, police complaints, First Nations policy and management and labour issues. Use of force theory, law and other legal issues related to the use of force will be discussed. Theory related to officer safety will be examined.

PF2103 Crime Scene Analysis and Reconstruction

From the glamour of hit television shows to the reality of the real men and women working in the field, Crime Scene Investigation has become an international phenomenon. This course will provide an overview of the main functions of a Forensic Identification Officer and will explore current tools of the trade and techniques used by law enforcement professionals today. Students will be offered a balance of both theory and practical hands-on training throughout the course. As a result, they will be able to put what they have learned into practice by way of scenario-based exercises.

PF3023 Youth in Conflict with Law

This course will enable the student to explain and analyze the historical, philosophical and contemporary application of statutes affecting youth in conflict with the law. As well this course will enable the student to examine and analyze, in the context of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (1982) and other relevant legislation, as well as the detention, interviewing and processing through the court structure of young offenders. In addition, the student will be able to summarize and appraise disposition alternatives which may be employed with a view to aiding and rehabilitating a young offender while facilitating public safety and victim response, if applicable.

PF4006 Community Placement

The community placement is designed to be a cooperative endeavor between the College’s Police Foundations program and various community agencies, service organizations and social service providers. The objective is to provide Police Foundations students with an opportunity to engage with both the service providers and service recipients in an effort to better understand the impact of socio-economic trends, personal and family dynamics on various individuals in our community. Students will engage in direct service provision in the form of volunteering. Students will work to solidify and practice a variety of critical skills to engage in professional relationship building, self-evaluation, self-care, and professional development. Students will take part in four Seminar days occurring approximately one day per month throughout the course. The content of the seminar will include presentations of volunteer experiences done in the context of skills applications and professional practices. The goal of both the seminars and the volunteer experience is to assist the Police Foundations student in acquiring greater self-awareness, intellectual growth, well-being, and understanding of others.

PF4083 Fitness and Lifestyle IV

This course will address back health, stress management, shift work and common injuries as related to law enforcement. Also included are various physical fitness readiness tests (including P.I.N. testing, the PREP test, etc.) required for entry into various law enforcement agencies. Increased awareness and increasing independence in physical fitness as a lifestyle is emphasized. Students are provided every opportunity to reach the level of physical fitness readiness necessary to prepare for entry into the police services field.

PR1053 Mental Health and Crisis Intervention in EMS

The first part of this course examines various perspectives of abnormal psychology. We seek to understand the nature and causes of abnormal behaviour. The patterns of abnormal (maladaptive) behaviour to be examined are: behaviour and emotional disorders of childhood and adolescence, eating disorders, substance-related disorders, anxiety disorders, dissociative and somatoform disorders, mood disorders, and schizophrenia. Stress and the psychological connection to mental illness and health will be investigated. Students will also study mental health law in Canada. The second part of this course examines the fundamental crisis theory that will serve as a basis for assessing, intervening and evaluating resolution of a crisis event. A six-step model of intervention is also presented along with specific helping objectives in order to guide the crisis interventionist. Recognizing that suicide risk often accompanies a crisis, students will recognize suicide lethality, and acquire specific techniques involved in interrupting a suicide attempt. Prevention and postvention measures will also be examined. Other crises to be discussed are crises related to loss, substance abuse, post-traumatic stress disorder, child abuse, intimate partner abuse and sexual assault. Finally, this course will deal with the topic of death notification.

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